Meeting of the General Faculty and the Faculty Council

April 23, 1999, 3:00 p.m.

Assembly Room, 2nd Floor, Wilson Library

Acting Chancellor William O. McCoy and Professor Richard N. Andrews will preside.

Agenda

INFO 3:00 Chancellor’s Remarks and Question Period.

INFO 3:10 Presentation of the 1999 Thomas Jefferson Award.

INFO 3:15 Presentation of 1999 Advising Awards. Dean Risa Palm

INFO 3:20 Chair of the Faculty’s Remarks. Prof. Richard N. Andrews

INFO 3:30 Faculty Elections Results. Prof. Joseph S. Ferrell, Secretary of the Faculty

INFO DISC 3:35 Update on Licensing Labor Code Task Force. Prof. Richard Andrews, Mr. Rutledge Tufts, Jr., co-chairs

INFO ACT 3:50 Report of the Task Force on Student Evaluation of Teaching. Prof. Elliot Hirshman, for the Advisory Committee

  • Res. 99-3. Endorsing Implementation of the Report of the Task Force on Student Evaluation of Teaching. Presented by Prof. Andrews for the Advisory Committee

DISC 4:05 Update Report from the Intellectual Climate Implementation Committee. Prof. Donna LeFebvre

ACT 4:20 Res. 99-4. On Adequate Funding for Teaching Resources. Presented by Prof. Gerald Postema for the Executive Committee of the Faculty Council

INFO 4:25 Status Report on the Capital Campaign Case Statement. Vice Chancellor Matt Kupec.

4:35 Annual Reports of Standing Committees

  • Committee on Black Faculty and Students. Prof. Frank Brown, chair
  • Faculty Assembly Delegation. Prof. Laura Gasaway, chair of the UNC Faculty Assembly
  • Committee on Established Lectures. Prof. Bobbi Owen, chair
  • Res. 99-5. Endorsing Abolition of the Committee on Established Lectures.
  • Committee on Community and Diversity. Prof. Gerald Horne, chair
  • University Priorities and Budget Committee.

INFO 4:45 Report from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Research. Vice Provost Tom Meyer.

ACT 5:00 Adjourn

 

Joseph S. Ferrell

Secretary of the Faculty

 

KEY:

ACT = Action
INFO = Information
DISC = Discussion

Minutes

Attendance

Present (52): Angel, Bender, Black, Bluestein, Bolas, Bowen, Carl, Clegg, Covach, Cravey, Daye, Debreczeny, Devellis, Elvers, Estroff, Fishman, Gasaway, Graham, Grossberg, Harrison, Holmgren, Hyatt, Johnson, Kjervik, LeFebvre, Levine, Lubker, Ludlow, Madison, Maffly-Kipp, Margolis, McKeown, Meehan-Black, Melchert, Moreau, Owen, Panter, Pfaff, Plante, Platin, Postema, Raper, Rosenfeld, Schaller, Shea, Steponaitis, Straughan, Strauss, Taft, Vevea, Weiss, Williams.

Excused absences (18): Adler, Bangdiwala, Blackburn, Collins, Cordeiro-Stone, Dalton, Eckel, Favorov, Foshee, Hattem, Hooper, Huang, Kaufman, Passannante, Raab-Traub, Thorp, Tysinger, White.

Unexcused absences (13): Fox, Graves, Haskill, Jackson, Lord, Marshall, Mill, Molina, Newton, Nord, Pagano, Sekerak, Werner,

Chancellor’s Remarks and Question Period.

Acting Chancellor William O. McCoy presided in the place of Chancellor Michael Hooker, who is on medical leave. Chancellor McCoy said that his thoughts and prayers are with Michael and Carmen Hooker in this difficult time. He deeply regrets the circumstances that have called him to this position. He sees his role as keeping the University focused on its current trajectory. His approach to management will be open and consultative.

Chancellor McCoy spoke briefly to the following topics:

  • Earlier today he accepted the recommendations of the Licensing Labor Code Advisory Committee. The trustees support the recommendations, and they are acceptable to the students who have been protesting..
  • The search for a new dean of the School of Law has concluded and the search for a new dean of the School of Nursing is nearing completion.
  • The Provost Search Committee has been constituted. Dean Jeffrey Houpt (Medicine) will chair the committee with Senior Associate Dean Richard Soloway (Arts & Sciences) as vice chair.
  • There is little prospect of substantial additional funding for current operations in the 1999-2000 State budget, but prospects look good for legislation that would enable The University System to fund capital projects through bond issues that do not require voter approval.

Chancellor McCoy concluded his remarks by congratulating Prof. Joseph DeSimone (Chemistry) whose research into the use of carbon dioxide as a solvent is finding a number of commercial and industrial applications.

Presentation of the 1999 Thomas Jefferson Award

Chancellor McCoy presented the 1999 Thomas Jefferson Award to Prof. Doris Waugh Betts (English). (The citation and Prof. Betts’ response will be found on the Faculty Governance website.)

Presentation of 1999 Advising Awards

Dean Risa Palm presented the 1999 advising awards. Mickel-Shaw Awards went to Prof. Todd Austell (Chemistry) and Aaron Nelson (Arts and Sciences). Class of 1996 Awards were presented to Jemma Grindstaff (Psychology), Prof. Steven Leonard (Political Science), and Prof. Joy Renner (Medical Allied Health Professions).

Report from the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Studies and Research

Vice Provost Tom Meyer reported to the Council on achievements in the Office of Graduate Studies and Research during his tenure in office. He concluded with a call for a thorough study of the UNC System. He fears that the System is losing sight of the mission articulated for it by President Friday of providing maximum support to the constituent institutions with a minimum of central control. Instead, it is functioning more and more as a centralized bureaucracy. Vice Provost Meyer argued forcefully that each campus needs greater budgetary and management autonomy coupled with strict accountability to the President, the Board of Governors, and the General Assembly. This model should not be controversial; it is in use in California, Michigan, and Virginia, and all private institutions. He urged the faculty to become familiar with these issues and to find appropriate ways to express its desires to the appropriate authorities. [A transcript of Vice Provost Meyer’s extensive remarks will be found on the Faculty Governance website.]

Chair of the Faculty’s Remarks

Prof. Andrews recognized faculty members who have received teaching awards this year.

  • Prof. Slayton Evans (Chemistry) received the Board of Governors Teaching Award.
  • Prof. Keith Burridge (Cell Biology & Anatomy), Prof. David Gottschalk (City & Regional Planning), Prof. Donald Ornstein (Law), and Prof. Jerry Saye (Information & Library Science) received Distinguished Teaching Awards for Post-Baccalaureate Instruction.
  • Prof. Debashis Aikat (Journalism & Mass Communication), Prof. Deborah Bialeschki (Leisure Studies & Recreation), Prof. Michael Crimmins (Chemistry), Lecturer Jean DeSaix (Biology), and Prof. Frank Church (Pathology & Laboratory Medicine) received Tanner Awards.
  • Julius Bailey, Kathleen Drowne, Eric Dugdale, Jeffrey W. Jones, and Christina Strafaci received Graduate Teaching Awards.
  • Prof. Robert Daniels (Anthropology) received the William C. Friday Award.
  • Prof. Jeffrey Dangl (Biology) received the John Sanders Teaching Award.
  • Prof. Richard Blackburn (Business School) and Prof. Thomas Warburton (Music) received Johnston Teaching Excellence Awards.
  • Prof. James A. Bryan II (Medicine) received the Mentor Award for Lifetime Achievement

Prof. Andrews reported on the work of the Licensing Labor Code Advisory Committee whose recommendations were accepted earlier today. There are three principal recommendations: (1) the University will insist on full disclosure of factory locations as licensing agreements are renewed, (2) we will undertake a study to define what is meant by a “living wage”, and (3) we endorse the principle of enforcement through independent monitoring of manufacturing sites. The committee recommends that no later than August 15 the University will notify all licensees of these and other principles that we have endorsed. Ninety days after that notice, those principles will be incorporated into our licensing agreements as they are renewed. The full disclosure requirement will cover both fully-owned and subcontracted sites. The University seeks to work closely and constructively with our licensees to find reasonable, good faith ways to implement the principles. We hope to start a pilot project this summer to include representative licensees of many sizes and types.

Prof. Andrews said that the related questions of labor standards and environmental protection that have been at the heart of the labor code discussions are among the major issues of the post-cold war economy. One of the great achievements of industrialized nations in this century has been systems of minimum social benefits for the protection of those at the low end of the socio-economic scale. These policies are being challenged by the globalization of the economy that has rapidly developed in the last quarter of the century. University logo licensing is only a miniscule element in that large pattern, but universities such as ours have historically been advocates for the values of reason and for the highest aspirations of society. We can provide a potent moral force and should try to engage and work with progressive businesses and governments to improve working conditions wherever they may be found.

Report of the Task Force on Student Evaluation of Teaching

Prof. Eliot Hirschman (Psychology) presented the report of the Task Force on Student Evaluation of Teaching, which he chaired. Other members are Prof. Abigail Panter (Psychology), Prof. Robert Adler (Business School), Prof. Margaret Miles (Nursing), Prof. Gilbert White (Medicine), Cindy Wolf-Johnson (Student Affairs), Prof. William Ware (Education), Todd Lewis (Academic Technology & Networks), Ed Neal (Center for Teaching & Learning), and Lindsee McPhail (undergraduate student). The Provost appointed the task force as requested by the Advisory Committee pursuant to Faculty Council Resolution 98-9, and asked it to design an instrument that could be used to (1) aid in evaluating faculty teaching, (2) serve as a means of helping faculty members to improve their teaching, and (3) serve as a guide to students. The task force worked in two subcommittees. One studied systems used in other institutions, particularly that used by the University of Michigan. The other worked on issues of interpretation and use of survey results.

Prof. Hirschman called special attention to three of the report’s recommendations. First, the task force recommends that the evaluation instrument have many opportunities for written comments; it should not be limited to multiple-choice questions. Second, the instrument should be flexible enough to enable its use throughout the University in a wide variety of instructional settings. Finally, interpretation and use of survey results should bear in mind that while student evaluations provide very important information, they also have significant limitations.

Prof. Timothy McKeown (Political Science) raised the question of reporting normative results as well as raw scores. He thought that it would be relatively easy to develop norms that take into account factors such as class size that can influence the responses to certain types of questions. Prof. Hirshman replied that this had been discussed but is not recommended at this time. As the instrument is used over time, a model could be developed that would account for a large number of assumptions, but the task force does not address that possibility in its report.

Prof. Craig Melchert (Linguistics) asked whether departments should expect to use the instrument recommended by the task force in the 1999-2000 academic year. Prof. Hirschman replied that should be anticipated if the Council endorses the task force’s report.

Prof. Virginia Shea (Physiology) asked whether the instrument would be useful for courses in which several instructors teach in sequence. Prof. Hirschman replied that the task force had not discussed or anticipated that format, but was aware that there would always be special situations.

Prof. Timothy Taft (Orthopaedics) asked whether the instrument would be required in the professional schools. Prof. Hirschman replied that the task force recommends that all instructional units take a look at the recommended instrument. There will be discussion about its suitability in some settings. The task force recognizes that modifications will be needed as experience with the instrument develops.

Prof. Bonnie Angel (Nursing) asked if the instrument is suitable for online instruction. Prof. Hirschman replied that it is not. The task force did not address that instructional setting.

Prof. Andrews called for discussion of Resolution 99-3, which endorses implementation of the report of the Task Force on Student Evaluation of Teaching and thanks for the task force for its excellent work. The resolution was adopted without audible dissent.

Faculty Elections Results

Prof. Joseph Ferrell, secretary of the faculty, reported the results of the 1999 faculty elections. He noted that 36% of the ballots were returned. The highest rates of return were in small voting divisions such as the Division of Fine Arts (53%), Pharmacy (67%), and the School of Information and Library Science (76%). The full report will be found on the Faculty Governance website.

Update Report from the Intellectual Climate Implementation Committee

Donna LeFebvre (Political Science) reported that the Intellectual Climate Implementation Committee has been monitoring implementation of the Task Force’s recommendations. Provost Richardson asked the committee to prepare four matrixes: (1) recommendations that require no funding, (2) recommendations that require funding, (3) personnel requirements of recommendations not yet implemented, and (4) recommendations that should be included in the upcoming capital campaign. These will inform future plans. Prof. LeFebvre called special attention to the Faculty Associates Program, part of the First Year Initiative, which will be implemented this Fall. Thirty positions in this program are available to faculty members. There will be a $5,000 stipend. Each associate will be work with a group of about 10 students out of a cohort of 300 who will be housed in Ehringhaus. Faculty members will soon receive notice of the program by mail. Although this is a program for undergraduates, the committee especially invites faculty members in the professional schools to participate.

Acting Provost Ned Brooks summarized several new programs that have sprung from the Intellectual Climate Task Force Report:

  • The Office of Undergraduate Research has been created.
  • A new Center for Public Service has been established with the aid of a major gift from a member of the Board of Visitors.
  • The  Office of the Provost is working to produce a public service database.
  • Implementation of the first-year seminars initiative is proceeding as planned.
  • The Office of Prestigious Scholarships, headed by Anne Repp, has been organized and is functioning with great success.

Res. 99-4. On Adequate Funding for Teaching Resources

Prof. Gerald Postema (Philosophy), on behalf of the Executive Committee of the Faculty Council, presented Resolution 99-4 providing as follows:

Section 1. The Faculty Council joins the Graduate and Professional Student Federation in urging the provost to establish a task force composed of members of the faculty, graduate teaching assistants, and administrators for the purpose of studying the disparity across campus of teaching resources provided to instructors and recommending a policy that establishes a minimum standard for provision of such resources.

Sec. 2. In the interim, the University should take immediate steps to cover all of the necessary costs of instructional support until a permanent policy is put in place.

Prof. Postema said that Brian Kennedy, past president of the Graduate and Professional Students Federation, had called attention to the fact that graduate teaching assistants are often required to provide resources needed for classroom teaching at their own expense. The ECFC found this to be shocking and recommends creation of a task force to ascertain the extent of the problem and to suggest a solution. The resolution was adopted without dissent.

Status Report on the Capital Campaign Case Statement

Acting Provost Brooks reported that reports from the case statement subcommittees are nearing completion. The campaign is proceeding as planned notwithstanding Chancellor Hooker’s illness.

Annual Reports of Standing Committees

Committee on Black Faculty and Students.

Prof. Ann Dunbar (African/Afro-American Studies) presented the report for Prof. Frank Brown, chair. There report was received without question or comment.

Faculty Assembly Delegation.

Prof. Laura Gasaway, chair of the UNC Faculty Assembly, presented the report which was received without question or comment.

Committee on Established Lectures.

Prof. Bobbi Owen (Dramatic Art) moved adoption of Resolution 99-5 which calls for abolition of the Committee on Established Lectures. Prof. Owen explained that the committee has been responsible for three established lectures: the John Calvin McNair Lecture on Science and Religion, the Weil Lecture on American Citizenship, and the Martin Luther King, Jr., Lecture. The committee believes that it is preferable to assign each of these lectures to an established unit of the University rather than to a committee whose membership changes annually. The committee has arranged to transfer the McNair Lecture to the Department of Religious Studies, the Weil Lecture to the Institute for the Arts & Humanities, and the King Lecture to the Office of the Chancellor. These transfers are agreeable to representatives of the original donors and to those departments. Resolution 99-5 was adopted without dissent.

Committee on Community and Diversity.

The report was received without question or comment.

University Priorities and Budget Committee.

The report was received without question or comment.

Joseph S. Ferrell
Secretary of the Faculty

 

Pdf of meeting materials

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